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HOW TOP 10 Women Entrepreneurs Started their Business

Updated: Apr 9, 2018



As an entrepreneur myself, I love listening and reading about female entrepreneurs who started their business from ground up with very little money.


One of my favorite podcasts is NPR’s “How I Built This”. This is a list of 10 women entrepreneurs who were interviewed by Guy Raz on “How I Built This” podcast.


Each podcast is about 30 - 45 minutes long. The inspiring women listed below talk about how they came up with their business ideas, struggles and eventual success. Click on the links to hear the podcasts.



Stitch Fix: Katrina Lake

In 2010, Katrina Lake recruited 20 friends for an experiment: she wanted to see if she could choose clothes for them that accurately matched their style and personality. That idea sparked Stitch Fix, an online personal shopping service that aims to take the guesswork out of shopping. Today, it has over two million customers and brings in nearly a billion dollars in annual revenue.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/how-i-built-this/e/53935367



LÄRABAR: Lara Merriken

In 2000, Lara Merriken was 32, recently divorced, and without a job when she decided to make energy bars by mixing cherries, dates, and almonds in her Cuisinart. Eventually, she perfected the recipe and launched her company: LÄRABAR. After just two years, the company was bringing in millions in revenue. In 2008, she sold to General Mills, but stayed on to help grow LÄRABAR into one of the biggest energy bar brands in the U.S.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/53754667



Bumble: Whitney Wolfe

At age 22, Whitney Wolfe helped launch Tinder, one of the world's most popular dating apps. But a few years later, she left Tinder and filed a lawsuit against the company alleging sexual harassment. The ensuing attention from the media – and cyberbullying from strangers – prompted her to launch Bumble, a new kind of dating app where women make the first move. Today, the Bumble app has been downloaded more than 20 million times.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/51828009



Barre3: Sadie Lincoln

Sadie Lincoln and her husband, Chris, had what seemed like the perfect life – well-paying jobs, a house in the Bay Area, two kids. But one day they decided to sell everything and start a new business called Barre3: a studio exercise program that blends ballet with pilates and yoga. Today, Barre3 has more than 100 studios across the country.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/51431997




Drybar: Alli Webb

A decade ago, full-time mom Alli Webb noticed a gap in the beauty market: there was nowhere that just focused on blow-drying hair. Now with 70 locations, Drybar is testament to Webb's motto: Focus on one thing and be the best at it.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/48755036




Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams: Jeni Britton Bauer

Even as a kid, Jeni Britton Bauer knew she was going to start a business one day. But she had no idea that her love for perfume would inspire her to start experimenting with ice cream. After years of hustling, she eventually launched Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams, a company that now has more than 30 stores nationally and touts unique flavors like Brambleberry Crisp and Lemon Buttermilk.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/53504725




Rent The Runway: Jenn Hyman

Jenn Hyman got the idea for Rent the Runway in 2008, after she watched her sister overspend on a new dress rather than wear an old one to a party. Jenn and her business partner built a web site where women could rent designer dresses for a fraction of the retail price. As the company grew, they dealt with problems that many female entrepreneurs face, including patronizing investors and sexual harassment. Despite these challenges, Rent The Runway now rents dresses to nearly six million women and has an annual revenue of $100 million.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/51037589



Aden + Anais: Raegan Moya-Jones

Cotton muslin baby blankets are commonplace in Australia, where Raegan Moya-Jones grew up. But when she started a new life and family in NYC, she couldn't find them anywhere. She was sure Americans would love muslin blankets as much as Australians. So in 2006, she started the baby blanket company Aden + Anais, which now makes more than $100 million in annual revenue.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/50801115




Spanx: Sara Blakely

At 27, Sara Blakely was selling fax machines and desperate to reinvent her life. So she came up with Spanx — hosiery that eliminates panty lines — and set to work building her business.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/46340238



Carol's Daughter: Lisa Price

Lisa Price worked in television but had a passion for beauty products. At her mother's suggestion, she began selling her homemade moisturizer at a church flea market. Twenty years later, Carol's Daughter is one of the leading beauty brands catering to African-American women.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/national-public-radio/how-i-built-this/e/50442951



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